Saturday, 30 November 2013

Fukushima Update - 11/29/2013

Hidden gov’t forecast shows Fukushima contamination spread throughout Northern Pacific Ocean in 5 years


29 November, 2013


China-Korea Cooperation on the Development of Ocean Monitoring and Prediction System of Radionuclides, 2013: In this study we are concerned with long-term oceanic-scale dispersion of Cs 137 released from the Fukushima Daiichi NPP. [...] the simulation is carried out up to 2041.


(This animation was left on the server and found by randomly typing in guesses for the URL address. Note that the ocean releases used for this model appear to end soon after 3/11. This means the daily release of 400 tons of radioactive water that’s likely been ongoing since the disaster began is not being accounted for.)


The model that is available for public viewing on the joint Chinese/Korean website was recently published here: Gov't model shows West Coast of N. America to get highest level of Fukushima contamination until 2030s (VIDEO)



To see video GO HERE





Typhoons spread Fukushima fallout, study warns
Typhoons that hit Japan each year are helping spread radioactive material from the Fukushima nuclear disaster into the country's waterways, researchers say.


28 November, 2013

Contaminated soil gets washed away by the high winds and rain and deposited in streams and rivers, a joint study by France's Climate and Environmental Science laboratory (LSCE) and Tsukuba University in Japan showed.

An earthquake-sparked tsunami slammed into the Fukushima plant in March 2011, sending reactors into meltdown and sparking the worst atomic accident in a generation.

After the accident a large number of radioactive particles were flung into the atmosphere, dispersing cesium particles which typically cling to soils and sediment.

Studies have shown that soil erosion can move the radioactive varieties of cesium-134 and 137 from the northern mountains near Fukushima into rivers, and then out into the Pacific Ocean.

"There is a definite dispersal towards the ocean," LSCE researcher Olivier Evrard said Wednesday.

The typhoons "strongly contribute" to soil dispersal, said Evrard, though it can be months later, after the winter snow melts, that contamination actually passes into rivers.

Local populations who escaped the initial fallout two-and-a-half years ago could now find their food or water contaminated by the cesium particles as they penetrate agricultural land and coastal plains, researchers warned.

Last year, the radioactive content of Japan's rivers dropped due to fairly moderate typhoons. But more frequent and fierce storms in 2013 have brought a new flood of cesium particles.

This is, said Evrard, "proof that the source of the radioactivity has not diminished upstream".

Tsukuba University has completed a number of studies on Fukushima since November 2011.

Scientists "concentrated mostly on the direct fallout from Fukushima yet this is another source of radioactive deposits" that must be taken into account, Evrard warned.

Coastal areas home to fishermen or where people bathe in particular face a potential risk.

Tens of thousands of people were evacuated from around the Fukushima plant following the disaster and nearby villages and towns remain largely empty as residents fear the risks of radiation.

The delicate process of decommissioning the site is expected to take decades.



AFP: Scientist warns of new flood of radioactive particles around Fukushima
  • Those who escaped initial fallout could now be exposed
  • People in coastal areas at particular risk


29 November, 2013


FP, Nov. 28, 2013: Typhoons that hit Japan each year are helping spread radioactive material from the Fukushima nuclear disaster into the country’s waterways, researchers say. [...] “There is a definite dispersal towards the ocean,” LSCE researcher Olivier Evrard said Wednesday. [...] Local populations who escaped the initial fallout two-and-a-half years ago could now find their food or water contaminated by the cesium particles as they penetrate agricultural land and coastal plains, researchers warned. [...] more frequent and fierce storms in 2013 have brought a new flood of cesium particles. This is, said Evrard, “proof that the source of the radioactivity has not diminished upstream”. [...] Scientists “concentrated mostly on the direct fallout from Fukushima yet this is another source of radioactive deposits” that must be taken into account, Evrard warned. Coastal areas home to fishermen or where people bathe in particular face a potential risk. […]


Evolution of radioactive dose rates in fresh sediment deposits along coastal rivers draining Fukushima contamination plume, Oct. 29, 2013: We show that coastal rivers of Eastern Fukushima Prefecture were rapidly supplied with sediment contaminated by radionuclides originating from inland mountain ranges [...] [The study authors] suggest that storage of contaminated sediment in reservoirs and in coastal sections of the river channels now represents the most crucial issue.  [...] Significant wet and dry radiocaesium deposits occurred on 15-16 March 2011, leading to the formation of a strong contamination plume over a distance of 70 km to the northwest of FDNPP. The area where soil contamination exceeds 100 kBq m−2 of 137Cs was estimated to cover ca. 3000 km2 […]




Fukushima SFP#4 Dog and Pony Show







Radioactive Reality (27 November 2013) I am Now a Criminal in Japan.. Fukushima Truth Suppressed




Fukushima: Watch impact of container being dropped during test here (27 November 2013)



2 comments:

  1. our pacific lobster have already mutated

    ReplyDelete
  2. Sort of a bizarre question maybe: has anyone flown an RC helicopter with a video camera around the site? There are relatively inexpensive multi-rotor copters being used as camera platforms on a routine basis these days. Think snowboarding and base jumping movies. Why not fly one in and take a look around?

    ReplyDelete