Saturday, 28 February 2015

The Nemtsov assasination

Breaking news: FALSE FLAG IN MOSCOW!


27 February, 2015


Boris Nemtsov has been shot dead in Moscow.  He was one of the most charismatic leaders of the "liberal" or "democratic" "non-system" opposition in Russia (please understand that in the Russian context "liberal" and "democratic" means pro-US or even CIA-run, while "non-system" means too small to even get a single deputy in the Duma).  He was shot just a few days before the announced demonstration of the very same "liberal" or "democratic" "non-system" opposition scheduled for March 1st. 


Nemtsov with Yushchenko

As I have already explained many times on this blog, the "liberal" or "democratic" "non-system" opposition in Russia has a popular support somewhere in the range of 5% (max). In other words, it is politically *dead* (for a detailed explanation, please read "From Napoleon to Adolf Hitler to Conchita Wurst").  In the hopes of getting a higher number of people to the streets the "liberal" or "democratic" "non-system"opposition allied itself with the ultra-nationalists (usually useful idiots for the CIA) and the homosexual activists (also useful idiots for the CIA).  Apparently, this was not enough.

And now, in *perfect* timing, Nemtsov is murdered.

We all know the reaction of the AngloZionists and their propaganda machine.  It will be exactly the same as for MH-17: Putin the Murderer!!! Democracy Shot!! Freedom Killed!! etc. etc. etc. etc.

There is no doubt in my mind at all that either this is a 
fantastically unlikely but always possible case of really bad luck for Putin and Nemtsov was shot by some nutcase or mugged, or this was a absolutely prototypical western false flag: you take a spent politician who has no credibility left with anyone with an IQ over 70, and you turn him into an instant "martyr for freedom, democracy, human right and civilization".

By the way if, as I believe, this is a false flag, I expect it to be a stunning success in the West and a total flop in Russia: by now, Russians already can smell that kind of setup a mile away and after MH-17 everybody was expecting a false flag.  So, if anything, it will only increase the hostility of Russians towards the West and rally them around Putin.  In the Empire, however, this will be huge, better than 
Politkovskaya or Litvinenko combined.  A "Nemtsov" prize will be created, a Nemtov statue will be place somewhere (in Warsaw?), the US Congress will pass a "Nemtsov law" and the usual combo package of "democratic hagiography" will be whipped-up.

What worries me most is that the Russian security services did not see this one coming and let it happen.  This is a major failure for the FSB which will now have a lot at stake to find out who did it.  I expect them to find a fall-guy, a patsy, who will have no provable contacts with any western services and who, ideally, might even have some contacts with the Russian services (like 
Andrei Lugovoi).

As for the "liberal" or "democratic" "non-system" - it will probably re-brand the upcoming protests as a "tribute to Nemtsov" thereby getting more people into the streets.

There are folks in Langley tonight who got a promotion.

The Saker



To illustrate the points made by the Saker, see the following from the Guardian


Russian opposition politician Boris Nemtsov shot dead in Moscow



The rise and sad demise of Boris Nemtsov, a former Yeltsin loyalist who became a remorseless critic 


Investigators are considering multiple scenarios of Nemtsov's murder

В деле об убийстве Бориса Немцова появились первые версии

RT,
27 February, 2015


2/27/2015
Translated from Russian by J.Hawk
Investigators are considering a personal motive scenario of the killing, as well as an contract killing by the Ukrainian sponsors of Nemtsov.
Izvestia reports that the investigators are considering several possible scenarios of Nemtsov’s murder. They are not excluding the possibility he was killed for ordinary personal reasons.
The young woman who was with Nemtsov at the moment of his murder is a citizen of Ukraine. We have established that she recently flew from Moscow to Switzerland to have an abortion. The investigators are trying to establish whether Nemtsov was her only partner, and we are not excluding the possibility there was a personal conflict over her,” notes a highly placed law enforcement source.
Nemtsov himself went to Ukraine on many occasions and had many contacts with the representatives of the local political and business elites, which represent the “party of war.”
They could have given him means to destabilize the situation in Russia. They could have well expected him to use the money to create a schism within the Russian society. However, there was no schism, rather the opposite—there was a consolidation. Once they realized there was no result the sponsors decided to get rid of the politician who could not carry out his task,” the same source describes the second scenario.
The third scenario also has political character.
This could have been a contract killing whose objective was to strike a blow against the government through a provocation. Both internal and external adversaries may have chosen their “victim” to destabilize the situation in Russia. Nevertheless, one must express surprise at the choice of the target. Given the record-high popularity of the current government, Nemtsov was little more than an average person who played a minimal role in society,” states the law enforcement source.
Those and other scenarios will be thoroughly investigated by the law enforcement.
As a reminder, Nemtsov was killed on Friday night in the center of Moscow on the Bolshoy Moskvoretskiy bridge.
According to preliminary information, the killer fired at least seven times at Nemtsov, hitting him in the back, then left the scene. Nemtsov died on the scene. 
The young woman who was with him was not injured. 
J.Hawk's Comment: I suppose the fourth scenario would be that the Russian government had him killed, but that one is the least plausible of all. This is simply not how politics are conducted in Russia these days. Of the scenarios above, the personal motive actually sounds the most plausible at the moment. It seems unlikely that Nemtsov could have obtained large sums of money and disposed of them without attracting anyone's notice. Even if he did misuse them, why kill him? He would still be useful to the Ukrainians alive. There's always a possibility Ukraine's "war party" needed a martyr, of course, so their involvement cannot be ruled out entirely. 
However, in the end, it does not seem coincidental that the young woman in question, a 23-year-old actress-model Anna Duritskaya, a native of Kiev, was with Nemtsov at the moment of his killing. She might have had other lovers; she most likely has relatives. At least one of them might not have been happy with her lifestyle choice. Moreover, a contract killer would have likely a) not needed to fire seven shots and b) would not have left a live witness on the scene. 

Nemtsov’s Assassination: A Propaganda Attack On Putin?


Paul Craig Roberts

KWN Roberts IV 2:27:2015

Boris Nemtsov, a Russian dissident politician highly critical of President Vladimir Putin often sounded like an agent of Washington. He was shot and killed today on a street near Red Square.

If Nemtsov wasn’t assassinated by the CIA in order to blame Putin, most likely Nemtsov was killed by Russian nationalists who saw him as Washington’s agent.

Remembering the Magnitsky affair that resulted in sanctions imposed on Russians as a result of the US Congress over-reacting to a jail death in Russia, Nemtsov’s death will likely be blamed on Putin. The Western media will repeat endlessly, with no evidence, that Putin had his critic killed.

I can tell you one thing, and that is that Putin is much too smart to play into Washington’s hands in this way. Moreover, Nemtsov, although a loud mouth, had no impact on Putin’s 85% approval rating. Nemtsov’s support resided in the Washington-funded NGOs in Russia. If the CIA assassinated Nemtsov, they killed their own asset.


It remains to be seen if the propaganda gains justify the CIA’s loss of a Putin critic.



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