Monday, 8 January 2018

Climate disruption in New Zealand - 01/08/2018

Never mind that the herd of elephants charging through the livingroom is igored. This is ONE day's climate-related headlines for one small country


2017 - the year extreme weather ravaged New Zealand


8 January, 2017

The past 12 months have been marked by extreme weather with New Zealand recording its fifth warmest year in more than a century.

Niwa today released its annual climate summary for 2017 saying the past year was a "year of extremes".


Annual rainfall was above normal across the country and for some regions including Auckland, Waikato, Bay of Plenty, coastal Canterbury and north coastal Otago, as much as 149 per cent.

It was an especially wet year in Oamaru which had its second wettest year on record - 813mm of rain - and its wettest winter ever. On July 21 a whopping 161mm of rain fell making it the wettest day in the town since records began in 1950.

At the same time the country enjoyed higher than usual temperatures, becoming the 5th warmest year since records began in 1909.

January was the only month where temperatures fell below average with six months recording above average temperatures.

April, August, September, October and November were all between .7C to 1.3C above average with December 2.4C above average.

🌡️ How warm was 2017 in New Zealand? 🌡️

➡️The 5th warmest year on record since 1909.
➡️The nation-wide average temp was 13.15°C or 0.54°C warmer than average.
➡️The 4 years: 2016, 2013, 1999, and 1998 were warmer than 2017.

While sunshine was near normal across the country Nelson was the sunniest region with 2633 hours of sun.

Niwa described 2017 was a year of two halves. The year started off on a west and stormy note across the South Island in January before reaching record or near-record rainfall and flooding across the North Island during the "Tasman Tempest", ex-Tropical Cyclone Debbie and ex-Tropical Cyclone Cook that swept through in March and April.

In terms of rainfall, 2017 was a year of two halves.

🌧️ The  (March),  & (April) contributed to record or near-record rainfall.

🌵 By the end of 2017, 11 out of NZ's 16 geographical regions were experiencing meteorological drought.

Later in the year parts of western and lower North Island were in a meteorological drought as very dry weather in November led to major decreases in soil moisture.

Niwa said Christchurch observed just a single mm of rain during November, the driest November on record. The city had a 47-day dry spell that was broken mid-December.

Sea surface temperatures also fluctuated starting off the year at normal levels but up to 4C above average as a "marine heatwave" hit coastal waters in November in December







Much of New Zealand is in for a summery week with temperatures soaring to 30C but won't be experiencing the searing heatwave scorching Australia.

Sunny skies have replaced the tempest that blew through the country at the end of last week.


With the blue skies temperatures are expected to soar as high as 30C in Blenheim and Alexandra and 29C in Christchurch, Hastings and Gisborne tomorrow.



The owners of the car are aware of what happened, police say.

A rogue wave has swept a vehicle into the sea at Wellington's Lyall Bay.

A police spokeswoman said the incident was reported about 6.15pm on Sunday, but it is not known when it happened.

The car had been parked at a popular fishing spot near the bay sometime over the weekend, the spokeswoman said.

The owners of the car are aware of what happened, police say.

"The car was parked there by the owner, and unfortunately a rogue wave hit the vehicle and dragged it into the sea.



Five-tonne concrete blocks from a temporary sea wall at Ohau point were swept onto SH1 on Sunday night.

State Highway 1 north of Kaikoura has been closed north of Kaikōura after temporary sea blocks were washed onto the road. 

Contractors have been working from first light Monday trying to shift the 5-tonne concrete blocks from the road near Ohau Point.
The temporary sea wall is 5 metres high but is expected to be double that when finished. 
SH1 had to be closed north of Kaikōura while workers moved the sea blocks.


Image result for wanaka fire

Fire crews may be back on Mt Alpha near Wanaka for the sixth day today, dampening down remaining hot spots from the fire that started on Wednesday afternoon and burnt almost 200ha of hillside pasture.

Fire Service southern communications shift manager Andrew Norris said three ground fire crews and a helicopter with a monsoon bucket were working on hot spots on the blackened hillside on Saturday and most of yesterday, during daylight hours.

The fire, which began just after 3pm on Wednesday, burnt 199ha of grass and heather on Hillend high country station. Principal rural fire officer Graeme Still described the fire as "very deep-seated" and predicted it would be several days before it was completely out.

Volunteer fire crews from around the Central Lakes district, Southland and Mount Cook, together with helicopters from several different companies were brought in to fight the blaze.



Yearly rainfall was above normal across the country and for some regions including Auckland, Waikato, Bay of Plenty, coastal Canterbury and north coastal Otago, as much as 149 per cent.

It was an especially wet year in Oamaru which had its second wettest year on record - 813mm of rain - and its wettest winter ever. On July 21 a whopping 161mm of rain fell making it the wettest day in the town since records began in 1950.

At the same time the country enjoyed higher than usual temperatures becoming the 5th warmest year since records began in 1909.

January was the only month where temperatures fell below average with six months recording above average temperatures.

April, August, September, October and November were all between .7 to 1.3C above average with December 2.4C above average.


Forecast Image


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