Thursday, 24 November 2016

Guy McPherson interviewed on New Zealand TV3

Here's the interview marking the beginning of Guy McPherson’s tour or NZ.

Paul Henry who is a sort of climate change denialist (or would like to be) is ironically more intelligent and switched-on than all the liberals at RNZ who deal exclusively in omission and half-truths

Humans 'don't have 10 years' left thanks to climate change - scientist
By Breanna Barraclough




24 November, 2016

There's no point trying to fight climate change - we'll all be dead in the next decade and there's nothing we can do to stop it, a visiting scientist has claimed.

Guy McPherson, a biology professor at the University of Arizona, says the human destruction of our own habitat is leading towards the world's sixth mass extinction.


Instead of fighting, he says we should just embrace it and live life while we can.

"It's locked down, it's been locked in for a long time - we're in the midst of our sixth mass extinction," he told Paul Henry on Thursday.

Prof McPherson is in New Zealand on a speaking tour. His comments come just days after Climate Change Issues Minister Paula Bennett appointed a 10-strong team to advise the Government on how New Zealand can adapt to climate change.

Govt appoints experts to tackle NZ's climate change problems
But if Prof McPherson is right, it's a complete waste of time.

"I can't imagine there will be a human on the planet in 10 years," he said.

"We don't have 10 years. The problem is when I give a number like that, people think it's going to be business as usual until nine years [and] 364 days."

Part of the reason he's given up while other scientists fight on is because they're looking at individual parts, such as methane emissions and the melting ice in the Arctic, instead of the entire picture, he says.

"I would hate to use the word lying - I think it's far worse than that.

"We're heading for a temperature within that span that is at or near the highest temperature experienced on Earth in the last 2 billion years."

National Geographic exhibition displays global climate change
But it's not all doom and gloom. While Prof McPherson says we should give up on the hope of fixing the climate, it doesn't mean we should stop living while we can.

"I think hope is a horrible idea. Hope is wishful thinking. Hope is a bad idea - let's abandon that and get on with reality instead. Let's get on with living instead of wishing for the future that never comes.

"I encourage people to pursue excellence, to pursue love, to pursue what they love to do. I don't think these are crazy ideas, actually - and I also encourage people to remain calm because nothing is under control, certainly not under our control anyway."

New Zealand has been criticised for not doing enough to fight climate change, this month being awarded two Fossil of the Day awards at the 22nd annual UN Climate Change Conference in Marrakech.

The awards were over its failure to live up to its climate promises and continued use of "dodgy" carbon credits.





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