Tuesday, 4 July 2017

Dahr Jamail on abrupt climate change - 07/04/2017

It's Raining in Antarctica While Trump Slashes Climate Science Funding


Dahr Jamail
In Antarctica, scientists were stunned to find rainfall and a melt area larger than the size of Texas in 2016. (Photo: Echinophoria / Getty Images) In Antarctica, scientists were stunned to find rainfall and a melt area larger than the size of Texas in 2016. (Photo: Echinophoria / Getty Images)

As President Donald Trump announced the US withdrawal from the Paris climate agreement, NOAA [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration] released data showing 2016 saw the biggest annual jump in atmospheric CO2 levels on record, coming in at nearly double the average pace.

NASA announced that April was the second hottest April in the history of record-keeping, and that agency, along with NOAA, released data showing that 2016 was the warmest year on record globally, making 2016 the third year in a row to set a new record for global average surface temperatures.
And the records continue to be broken. NASA data showed May to be the second hottest on record, barely trailing 2016 by one-tenth of a degree, and this was the second-warmest spring on record, again only behind 2016. The first five months of this year make it likely that this will be the second hottest year on record, again only behind last year.
Meanwhile, parts of Antarctica are literally beginning to turn green, as scientists there are finding a four- to five-fold increase in the amount of moss growth on the ice continent's northern peninsula.
Even more stunning news comes from Antarctica in a study published in the June 15 issue of the journal Nature Communications which revealed that over an area of West Antarctica, scientists were stunned to find rainfall and a melt area larger than the size of Texas in 2016.
Yes, it is now raining in Antarctica.
The New York Times published a fantastic interactive piece on the ice continent that is well worth a look, while warm temperatures last fall caused water to breach the entrance of the Arctic's "Doomsday" seed vault, one of humans' last hopes of preserving seeds to survive a global catastrophe.
Meanwhile, Arctic sea ice is disappearing off Alaskan coasts more than a month earlier than normal, and due to congressional budget cuts, the 38-year continuous US Arctic satellite monitoring program is about to end, leaving researchers in the dark about ongoing sea ice losses.
And this May, atmospheric CO2 content set an all-time monthly high when it reached 409.65ppm, according to NOAA data.

To read the article GO HERE




No comments:

Post a Comment