Sunday, 10 April 2016

The people call for the resignation of David Cameron

Crowds march in London to demand Cameron resignation following Panama Papers leak



RT,

9 April, 2016


A massive protest has gathered in front of PM David Cameron’s residence at 10 Downing Street, calling for his resignation. The rally follows the so-called Panama Papers leak, which among others exposed the offshore dealings of Cameron’s late father.

The massive and largely peaceful rally right in front of 10 Downing Street saw hundreds of protesters gathering while shouting “Resign, resign!”

Cameron must go!” and “Tories out!” read the placards held by the demonstrators, RUPTLY’s live feed showed. A huge paper pig was erected by the protesters, with Cameron’s image pinned to its face.




RT UK’s Laura Smith talked to some of the people who had taken to the streets to join the protest. “A lot of people feel they have lost confidence in the government,” one man said, with another adding that “this is a symptom of a much more important disease, our economic system is broken … as it favors a huge tax avoidance.”

The #ResignCameron rally then moved on to Trafalgar Square, where thousands of people joined in the call for the prime minister to go.

Thousands calling for passing Trafalgar Square
Meanwhile, Ruptly’s Jon Scammell tweeted that there had been clashes and arrests in Parliament Square as police shut down the protest.

Clashes and arrests as police shut down protest


Cameron came clean about his tax affairs on Thursday evening, admitting that between 1997 and 2010 he and his wife, Samantha Cameron, owned shares in his father’s Blairmore Investment Trust – a multimillion-pound offshore trust fund.

"The British will never protest," they said. Details:

Cameron said he sold the shares for around £30,000 (US$42,000) in 2010, four months before becoming PM.

Little coverage so far, but appears thousands of people are protesting in London about Panama

On Saturday Cameron said that this week wasn’t great. “I know that I should have handled this better, I could have handled this better. I know there are lessons to learn and I will learn them.”

He is under yet more pressure after an unearthed 2013 letter shows he urged the EU to shield offshore trusts from a crackdown.

On Friday NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden urged the British people to demand Cameron’s resignation from government.


The hashtag #ResignDavidCameron has been trending on Twitter.

Thousands march on No10 calling for Cameron to quit over tax revelations as Lily Allen brands him 'dishonest' - and under-fire PM admits 'I could have handled it better' 

  • Protesters called for Mr Cameron to resign after he admitted profiting from more than £30k in an offshore tax haven
  • Revelations about Mr Cameron's financial affairs followed a leak of 11 million documents held by Mossack Fonseca
  • PM's ratings now lower than Jeremy Corbyn with 56% saying they did not think he had been 'open and transparent'
  • Speaking at the Tory Spring Conference, Mr Cameron admitted he botched the handling of the row over his finances 


9 April, 2016


Thousands of protesters have marched on Downing Street calling for David Cameron to quit in the wake of revelations about his tax affairs.

The embattled Prime Minister was accused of 'hypocrisy' after he finally admitted profiting from more than £30,000 in an offshore tax haven.After days of pressure, 

Mr Cameron acknowledged he had benefited from a controversial fund set up by his late father Ian. 

In the wake of that extraordinary interview, thousands lined Whitehall today urging Mr Cameron to 'go now'. 

Thousands of protesters have marched on Downing Street calling for David Cameron to quit in the wake of revelations about his tax affairs
Thousands of protesters have marched on Downing Street calling for David Cameron to quit in the wake of revelations about his tax affairs 
The protesters stood on Whitehall calling on the Prime Minister to quit after he admitted he profited from more than £30,000 in an offshore tax haven
The protesters stood on Whitehall calling on the Prime Minister to quit after he admitted he profited from more than £30,000 in an offshore tax haven
Protesters stand on Whitehall chanting 'David Cameron must resign / Tax evasion is a crime' following the bombshell revelations this week
Protesters stand on Whitehall chanting 'David Cameron must resign / Tax evasion is a crime' following the bombshell revelations this week
Protesters held up placards saying 'Cameron must go', 'Tories out', 'Defy Tory Rule' and 'Time to go chum' outside Downing Street

Protesters held up placards saying 'Cameron must go', 'Tories out', 'Defy Tory Rule' and 'Time to go chum' outside Downing Street


Protesters - many wearing Panama hats - arrived at Downing Street carrying placards saying 'he's got to go', 'time to go chum' and 'Eton's mess'.


A huge pig with the Prime Minister's face emblazoned on the front was hoisted into the air above the crowd who chanted 'David Cameron must resign / Tax evasion is a crime'.


Events started at 11am and around 2,000 people are expected at Downing Street over the course of the day.


The protests are being organised around the hashtags 'Resign Cameron' and 'Close tax loopholes', and have gained support from high-profile figures Edward Snowden and Lily Allen.


Speaking to Sun Online, the pop singer said: 'I think he's been dishonest and the trust has gone.


'I just think it's really important that young people take more of an interest in politics so that's why I'm here really. I think lots of people in my position don't because they're scared of the repercussions.'


Protesters drew inspiration from events in Iceland when huge pressure from furious protesters forced Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson to resign after it was revealed his family had sheltered money offshore as the country was almost brought to its knees during the 2008 financial crash.


They also descended on the Tory Spring Conference at the Grand Connaught rooms and four lines of police had to block the entrance to the building.


The organiser of the Downing Street protest, freelance writer Abi Wilkinson, told BBC Radio 5 the bombshell revelations raised questions about Mr Cameron's commitment to tackling tax avoidance.


She said: 'The thing that really made us think we had to get out and protest was the news that, in 2013 when the EU were trying to crack down on offshoring and tax avoidance, he stepped in and actually weakened what they were trying to do.'


But Commons leader Chris Grayling said those accusing Mr Cameron of misleading the public were making a 'mountain out of a mole hill'.




Speaking today, Mr Cameron promised to 'learn the lessons' from the toxic row over his ownership of shares in his late father's offshore investment fund and insisted voters should 'blame me' over the affair.


The Prime Minister admitted he could have handled questions about his tax affairs better but said he had been 'angry' about accusations made about his father.


Mr Cameron announced today he would release six years of his personal tax returns to persuade the public he was being transparent.


New polls suggest 56 per cent of the public did not believe Mr Cameron had been 'open and transparent' about his tax affairs after his bombshell admission on Thursday night that he did in fact own £31,000 in shares in his father's firm until January 2010.


Mr Cameron said today: 'It's not been a great week. I know that I should have handled this better, I could have handled this better, I know there are lessons to learn and I will learn them.


'Don't blame No 10 Downing Street, or nameless advisors. Blame me. And I will learn the lessons.'


Mr Cameron said he was 'very angry' about the accusations levelled against his late father, who died in 2010.


'I love my dad,' he said. 'I miss him every day, he was a wonderful father and I am very proud of everything he did.


'But I must not let that cloud the picture. The facts are these: I bought the shares in the unit trust, shares that are like any other sort of shares.


'I paid tax on them in exactly the same way. I sold those shares, in fact I sold all the shares that I owned on becoming Prime Minister.


'And later on, I will be publishing the information that goes into my tax return - not just this year but for years gone past because I want to be completely transparent and open about these things.'


The collapse in trust in Mr Cameron threatens to wreck Tory efforts to make progress in town hall elections across England and to hold onto City Hall in London when voters go to the polls in a little more than three weeks.


The details of the new polling out reveals a grim picture for Mr Cameron.


Mr Corbyn has warned the public had lost trust in the Premier after he 'misled' them.


Just 34 per cent of voters told YouGov they felt Mr Cameron was doing a good job overall, compared to 58 per cent who disapprove of his work in No 10.


Mr Corbyn holds a narrow overall lead on job approval for the first time - driven by a 40 point collapse in Mr Cameron's ratings and a modest improvement in the Labour leader's scores.


Some 30 per cent of voters said Mr Corbyn was doing well as Leader of the Opposition, compared to 52 per disapprove.


On the specific issue of tax avoidance, Mr Cameron was distrusted by 68 per cent of people to deal with the issue.


Only Chancellor George Osborne scored worse in the YouGov survey.


No 10 today indicated Mr Cameron would release tax returns dating back to the 2009-10 tax year - the year in which he and wife Samantha sold their £31,000 stake in Blairmore Holdings.


The Camerons made a £19,000 profit on the 5,000 shares and the Prime Minister has insisted all relevant UK taxes were properly paid.


He also accepted that some of the £300,000 left to him by his father may also have come from funds lodged offshore.


Mr Cameron made the revelation on Thursday night after dodging questions on his financial affairs.


Earlier in the week, Mr Cameron had made an extensive statement on his present arrangements - but omissions were swiftly picked up on for raising more questions than answers.


Downing Street spent all week dealing with questions on the Prime Minister's tax affairs following revelations last Monday that Ian Cameron was named in the so-called 'Panama Papers'.


His father's investment fund, Blairmore, was named after the house in Huntly, Aberdeenshire, where Ian Cameron was born in 1932.


The company was incorporated in the secretive Panama jurisdiction in 1982 and operated out of the tax haven of the Bahamas. The firm hired Bahamas residents, including a bishop, to sign off paperwork and held meetings in the Caribbean.


The arrangement, while legal, allowed the company to avoid paying UK tax for decades.


The fund also made use of 'bearer shares' which enable people to hide their assets.


On Monday No 10 said the Cameron family's dealings in Blairmore were a 'private matter'. The Prime Minister and Downing Street then issued three further statements over the following 48 hours in a bid to close down the growing controversy.


But on each occasion, they avoided key questions about whether the PM's family had benefited from offshore investments in the past.


As the questions continued to mount, Mr Cameron finally decided to make a full statement of his affairs in an interview on ITV News.


Following that revelation, Mr Corbyn has led calls for Mr Cameron to explain himself in Parliament on Monday while some Labour MPs have demanded the PM resign over the row.


Bassetlaw MP John Mann has referred the affair to Parliament's sleaze watchdog with questions about whether Mr Cameron should have detailed his ownership of the shares on his House of Commons register of interests.


Labour's deputy leader Tom Watson said the Prime Minister should repay at least part of the profits he made from offshore investments – and questioned why he had taken six years to reveal them.


Lib Dem leader Tim Farron added: 'For ordinary taxpayers to have faith in the system they have to be able to have faith in their leaders. They deserve better than half-truths and qualified statements.'






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