Saturday, 28 April 2012

European news


Merkel, Hollande clash over debt crisis
German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French Socialist Party presidential candidate Francois Hollande have had a war of words over how to handle the European debt crisis.


27 April, 2012

It is "not for Germany to decide for the rest of Europe", Hollande, who is the favorite in France’s May 6 run-off election, said on Friday, The Daily Telegraph reported.

He went on to say that if elected, he would not approve the fiscal austerity pact agreed by the leaders of 25 European states unless it includes measures to stimulate growth.

Merkel hit back, saying France cannot rewrite the eurozone fiscal pact.

The deal is “not open to new negotiations,” She insisted.

"The fiscal pact is negotiated, it was signed by 25 government leaders and has already been ratified by Portugal and Greece," Merkel stated.

"Parliaments across Europe are on the verge of passing it. Ireland is having a referendum at the end of May," she added.

The issue of how to tackle the eurozone's debt burden has led to the collapse of governments across Europe. On Friday, the Romanian government collapsed as it lost a no-confidence vote over state asset sales. Earlier this week, the Dutch government fell after failing to agree on spending cuts to comply with the new rules.


Romania govt falls in no-confidence vote
ROMANIA'S government has fallen in a no-confidence vote, as opposition parties seized on widespread public anger over biting austerity measures, cronyism and corruption.



Some 235 politicians today voted against the government of Prime Minister Mihai Razvan Ungureanu, four votes more than needed.

Opposition leader Victor Ponta said the vote represented the end "of an abusive system that uses any weapon possible".

"Sometimes there is justice. Today there was justice," he said.

President Traian Basescu will nominate a new prime minister who will then need to present a governing program to Parliament for approval. The Czech government also faces a vote of no confidence today.



Tanker drivers to vote for strike in UK after talks fail
Britain’s fuel tanker drivers would go on a strike now that union officials voted against a proposed deal and urged their members to do the same, local media reported.



27 April, 2012

According to reports, the proposal was put together through Acas, the industrial mediation service, but was rejected by Unite officials, who declared it fell short of what was needed.

Their refusal to back the plan raises the spectre of fuel shortages and queues at petrol stations worse than those prompted recently when the government advised motorists to hoard fuel.

Union delegates recognised good progress had been made in addressing health, safety and training concerns but that more improvements are needed in pensions, security of employment, contracting and sub-contracting if they are to back a deal, the Independent said in a report.

The proposal is now to be put before more than 2,000 tanker drivers working for seven fuel oil distribution companies with the union recommending that they reject it.

"The proposals represent progress on some of the key areas. But it is clear that they do not give enough guarantees that the instability and insecurity gripping the industry will come to an end”, said Diana Holland, Unite's assistant general secretary.

"It is in everyone's interest that we end the contract merry-go-round and the erosion of standards. Delegates felt the proposals did not meet members' expectations and are recommending that members reject them in the consultative ballot." The ballot is expected to close on 11 May.

The announcement came as ballot papers were sent out to more than 530 tanker drivers working for the oil distribution firm Hoyer. Unite is re-balloting its members following concerns that some did not receive voting papers in the original ballot. .



British protesters face new hurdle
London’s High Court has upheld a ruling which prevents demonstrators from sleeping near the UK’s Houses of Parliament, local media reported.


27 April, 2012

Two judges rejected a test case human rights challenge on Friday brought by veteran peace campaigner Maria Gallastegui, who has been conducting an authorized 24-hour vigil on the East Pavement of Parliament Square in London since 2006.

Sir John Thomas, who is president of the Queen's Bench Division, sitting with Mr Justice Silber, said the rules were "plainly" lawful and did not contravene the Human Rights Act.

Under the rules, protesters are not allowed to set up tents or "sleeping equipment" in Parliament Square.

The judges said Ms Gallastegui could not be moved until after a further High Court hearing on Thursday 3 May - when her lawyers are expected to seek permission to appeal.

Gallastegui, 53, a former coach driver from Hammersmith, west London, said she was hopeful of overturning the ruling on appeal.

"I am hopeful that I can still win," she said after the hearing. "The ruling today didn't surprise me really."

"I'm not just fighting this case for me now. There's a lull in protest at the moment. This is for the future - for if another issue comes along and there is a critical mass of people who want to protest against, for example, another war", she added.

Gallastegui is protesting against "the folly of war and armed conflict" in Iraq and Afghanistan

Gallastegui said she had been involved with the Parliament Square protest for 10 years and had lived on the site for six years.

Judges said Gallastegui could not be moved until after a further high court hearing next Thursday.

At that hearing, lawyers for Gallastegui said they would probably seek permission to appeal.


Tanker drivers to vote for strike in UK after talks fail
Britain’s fuel tanker drivers would go on a strike now that union officials voted against a proposed deal and urged their members to do the same, local media reported.


27 April, 2012

According to reports, the proposal was put together through Acas, the industrial mediation service, but was rejected by Unite officials, who declared it fell short of what was needed.

Their refusal to back the plan raises the spectre of fuel shortages and queues at petrol stations worse than those prompted recently when the government advised motorists to hoard fuel.

Union delegates recognised good progress had been made in addressing health, safety and training concerns but that more improvements are needed in pensions, security of employment, contracting and sub-contracting if they are to back a deal, the Independent said in a report.

The proposal is now to be put before more than 2,000 tanker drivers working for seven fuel oil distribution companies with the union recommending that they reject it.

"The proposals represent progress on some of the key areas. But it is clear that they do not give enough guarantees that the instability and insecurity gripping the industry will come to an end”, said Diana Holland, Unite's assistant general secretary.

"It is in everyone's interest that we end the contract merry-go-round and the erosion of standards. Delegates felt the proposals did not meet members' expectations and are recommending that members reject them in the consultative ballot." The ballot is expected to close on 11 May.

The announcement came as ballot papers were sent out to more than 530 tanker drivers working for the oil distribution firm Hoyer. Unite is re-balloting its members following concerns that some did not receive voting papers in the original ballot. .




No comments:

Post a Comment